obligatory obscure reference


self-deprecating yet still self-promotional witty comment

2017/11/19

Blocking the mount of a UF2 Bootloader in OSX (and maybe Linux)

Filed under: Arduino,Hacking — jet @ 00:04

I’m really liking Adafruits “Metro Express” version of the Arduino Zero.

Except for one thing.

The UF2 boot loader.  Every time I compile and load a sketch I get a whine notification from OSX about how I’ve unmounted a volume without the proper Steve Jobs NeXT dance.

The fix is actually pretty simple — tell fstab to stop mounting the filesystem in the first place.  Apple has one solution but it needs a few tweaks for the UF2 boot system.

I'll use Adafruit's METRO as an example.  

First, use diskutil to find the UUID of the METRO:

$ diskutil info /Volumes/METROBOOT/
 Device Identifier: disk3
 Device Node: /dev/disk3
 Whole: Yes
 Part of Whole: disk3
 Device / Media Name: Metro M0 Media

Volume Name: METROBOOT

Mounted: Yes
 Mount Point: /Volumes/METROBOOT

File System Personality: MS-DOS FAT16
 Type (Bundle): msdos
 Name (User Visible): MS-DOS (FAT16)

Content (IOContent): None
 OS Can Be Installed: No
 Media Type: Generic
 Protocol: USB
 SMART Status: Not Supported
 Volume UUID: CA043DAF-C1C3-33CC-A5C4-A4B0D2BFDE85

Total Size: 4.1 MB (4096000 Bytes) (exactly 8000 512-Byte-Units)
 Volume Free Space: 3.5 MB (3530240 Bytes) (exactly 6895 512-Byte-Units)
 Device Block Size: 512 Bytes
 Allocation Block Size: 512 Bytes

Read-Only Media: No
 Read-Only Volume: No

Device Location: External
 Removable Media: Yes
 Media Removal: Software-Activated

Virtual: No
 OS 9 Drivers: No
 Low Level Format: Not supported

Now, use vifs to change the fstab file:

$ sudo vifs

and add this line to the end of the file using the “Volume UUID” field to replace [Volume UUID]

UUID=[Volume UUID] none msdos ro,noauto

save and quit, then run

$ sudo automount -vc

to update your mac with the new fstab file.

This should stop the device from automounting under OSX and make the METRO work like a “normal” Arduino.

 

2017/03/17

E3D Silicone Socks Change PID Settings

Filed under: E3D Printers — jet @ 21:00

Getting ready to put E3D’s “Silicone Socks” on my E3D-V6 and thought, “hey, my kitchen oven mitts are silicone and I can handle 450F pots out of the oven, I wonder how much insulation the socks provide and does it change the PID?”

Two PID tunes later, one without the sock, one with, both starting from a room temp 22C V6 and using the g-code “M303 E0 S240 C8”

Without sock:
p 26.95 i 2.45 d 74.19

With sock:
p 32.75 i 3.54 d 75.8

Which makes sense — p’s change means there is more error (heat loss is lower than bare metal), i’s change is the accumulation of previous errors.  The derivative, d, stays roughly the same because p and i have similar changes in value.  (I did poorly in calculus and am trying to explain this to people who wasted a semester and failed Calc I trying to understand how derivatives work.)

What this implies is that the V6 extruders will heat more quickly thanks to the insulation and will cool more slowly after a print finishes.  I can’t think of any prints where I changed the temperature of the print head during a print so this should “just work” after I update the PID values in Marlin.

2016/05/19

Qt5 patch: make qmake look in pwd for .prf file

Filed under: Hacking,OS X and Linux — jet @ 12:30

Only tested on OS X


git diff -p --no-ext-diff
diff --git a/qmake/library/qmakeevaluator.cpp b/qmake/library/qmakeevaluator.cpp
index e9da45c..dbe8f41 100644
--- a/qmake/library/qmakeevaluator.cpp
+++ b/qmake/library/qmakeevaluator.cpp
@@ -1475,7 +1475,11 @@ void QMakeEvaluator::updateFeaturePaths()

QStringList feature_roots;

- foreach (const QString &f, m_option->getPathListEnv(QLatin1String("QMAKEFEATURES")))
+ // JET 20160519 this makes it look in the pwd for a .pro file
+ // "works for me!"
+ feature_roots += QDir::currentPath();
+
+ foreach (const QString &f, m_option->getPathListEnv(QLatin1String("QMAKEFEATURES")))
feature_roots += f;

feature_roots += m_qmakefeatures;

2016/04/12

made a thing: rotating “Lazy Susan” tool rack

(Susan wasn’t lazy, she was efficient. There’s a difference.)

After seeing Adam Savage’s take on mobile tool racks I started designing some for my Big Things studio.

Then I realized, no, I need one like ten years ago for my Small Things studio. Cue the cycle of “design, test, improve” and finally I had a version for me. I like it so much I decided to put copies up for sale at Etsy. If you want a custom version for your own special set of You No Touch These Tools we can work something out.

Having a Lasersaur in the Big Things studio is more useful than I expected.

(p.s. Boxing up S/N #1 for Adam tomorrow afternoon.)

2016/02/20

In other beehive news,

Filed under: Beekeeping — jet @ 23:25

Well, it was a happy/sad weekend for our bees. We’re having a brief warm spell, 50F instead of 25F, so I re-checked the hives for fondant. The weaker hive is a dead out, but I had time to clean up the mess before pests come in. Most of the dead bees were in the bottom and a small cluster, maybe the size of a grapefruit died at the top of the hive near plenty of fondant. They just couldn’t keep up the temperature in the 0F weather a couple of weeks ago. Some of them were face-down in comb looking for warmth/food, but the rest were just in a ball.

Cleaned all that out then went to look at the hive that was performing good hygiene and kicking out dead bees. They were strong, just starting on the fondant I put out a few weeks ago, and pissed off. Which means they’re pretty healthy if they’re in the mood to defend the hive.

Today we went to the Western PA meeting of the state beekeeping association and saw some good talks on splitting and feeding. We’re going to remake our most recent batch of fondant mixing in bee pollen and aminos. One of our local beeks, “only 48 years in the business”, has about 80 hives and has been experimenting with foods for the past 10 years in controlled a/b tests.

His results are almost unbelievable. He has so many strong hives now that he’s starting to pre-order queens so he can split as many as 40 hives. “Overfeeding” bees seems to be the right thing to do, not the wrong thing. Give them enough carbs, vitamins, and aminos that the younger bees can mature and the older bees are ready to go as soon as it gets warm.

Another speaker talked about splitting and winter hives and planning in Summer what you want in the Spring. If you want 10 hives next year, assume a significant portion will die out and plan on having 13 strong hives by the end of summer.

Tomorrow we’ll redo the fondant for the one strong hive and start getting ready for the two nucs that show up in March. We’ve also got a new location for two hives (if we can split/buy more) and a potential third location next year for as many as 16 or 20 if we have the time/investment dollars.

2015/09/26

DIY Lasersaur Fume Extraction

Filed under: digifab,Lasersaurs and laser cutters — jet @ 11:36

After building my second Lasersaur, the current release candidate, I started doing a lot more cutting and realized I needed to find a good fume filter. I started designing my own and while doing research discovered that someone had already solved the problem and distributed plans on Instructables. It’s a self-contained laser cutter fume extractor and it does a great job filtering out smoke and acrylic. I sit next to it while running jobs and I can’t smell even a whiff of smoke.

While crawling around under the work bench routing the exhaust from the Lasersaur to the filter I was reminded that my studio (a converted garage) is pretty damn dusty. I’m making dust covers for my computer and CNC headend and putting filters over the cooling fans, and I started thinking about where my Lasersaur gets fresh air. The exhaust fan pulls ~400 CFM of air through a 6″ exhaust port but there’s no 6″ port for air to come in. A few test cuts later and it was pretty obvious I needed dedicated air input to balance the exhaust.

My fix is pretty simple: put an air filter on the opposite side of the cutting bed. The question is what size filter and where should it be located? I tried a few variations with cardboard mock-ups and it looks like having the filter planar level with the cutting bed was the best plan. The filter is some leftover HVAC stuff from the box store and it probably needs a better mount than leftover duct tape, but for now it works just fine.

There are some photos on flickr and here’s a short video of tests and the final result:

2015/09/25

Laser Cutting and Fume Extraction

Filed under: digifab,Lasersaurs and laser cutters — jet @ 12:43

Disclaimer

This is not legal advice or opinion on the rules and regulations for installing or using a laser cutter. These are notes on what I’ve learned and a guide for people interested in having a laser cutter.

What’s all this, then?

I’ve been working with, near, or in toxic fumes since I was a teenager. I’ve wrenched, welded, soldered, used metal working machines, worked on motorcycles and cars, and built CNC equipment, including several 3d printers and a couple of Lasersaurs. I’ve taken and taught safety classes and I’ve still made some stupid mistakes.

It’s easy and inexpensive to get home/shop level digifab equipment like laser cutters but not much out there on what it means to own and operate one.

I wrote this short introduction to laser cutters and fume extraction based on what I’ve learned in work spaces and my studio. I hope that sharing what I’ve learned helps other people interested in setting up a laser cutter.

Fume Extraction

Let’s start by defining what “fume extraction” actually is — removing fumes and particles suspended infumes from an area. Many processes we use create annoying, hazardous, or lethal fumes and fume extraction gets them out of the work area.

Some examples of fume extraction:

  • remove lead and solder fumes from the air around a soldering station
  • remove air containing viral contaminants from a safety area where someone is doing medical research
  • filter or remove greasy smoke out of a kitchen in a home or restaurant
  • remove toxic side-products of welding from a welding station in a closed room

For laser cutters, there are two specific reasons to do fume extraction:

  • remove vaporized particles and fumes from a laser cutter work space to protect the people using the laser cutter
  • clear the air inside the laser cutter to prevent fumes from damaging the media or the laser cutter equipment

Who needs fume extraction?

Anyone generating fumes that are bad for people to breathe, harmful to the environment, or that can damage the tools they are using. That’s a sweeping statement, but there’s a wide scale of materials that can be used as media in a laser cutter. On one end are people who have a business making models but of plywood or cardboard and never cut plastic or etch powder coating off of metal. On the other end is a hacker space, college studio, or Techshop where there’s a “DANGER: do not cut” list and temporarily illiterate laser cutter operators.

Fume extraction isn’t fume filtration!

Note that we’re saying “extraction” not “removal” or “filtration”. Fume extraction means moving the fumes from one area (inside a laser cutter) another area (outside the laser cutter). If you’re laser cutting something that generates toxic fumes and you have wonderful extraction, you’re just moving te toxic fumes to another location. Extracted fumes don’t disappear and an important part of fume extraction is deciding what to do with the fumes. (Saturday Night Live’s “Yardapult” is a funny but real example of what some sites consider fume extraction.)

Laser cutter restrictions

Did your laser cutter come with a manual that explains restrictions on what media you can cut and fume ventilation requirements? Start by reading the manuals and FAQs, there might be limitations on what you can cut or etch because of the materials used to build your laser cutter. One example is what your mirrors are made of — are they backed glass or polished metal? Some mirrors need routine cleaning if you’re cutting smoky materials, even if you have the best fume extraction possible.

What can the fumes damage?

Everything, starting with the person using the equipment and nearby people, then to the equipment (see below), or people near where the fumes are sent as exhaust. If you’re only cutting paper and cardboard and sending the exhaust up a legal fireplace chimney, there’s not much more risk from the fumes than having a fire in the fireplace. If you’re cutting and etching acrylic in volume and dumping the unfiltered exhaust out your garage window, don’t be surprised if the neighbors dial 911 to complain about the smell of burning plastic.

You could also be working with something you think is safe but isn’t. I no longer cut hardboard in my lasersaur because the heat from cutting the wood also does something to the glue and makes the wood sticky. Not sticky in a good, ice cream sort of way, but a sticky burnt glue that sticks to the moving parts and is hard to remove, even with solvent.

Did you read the Material Safety Data Sheet (aka “MSDS”) for the media you’re cutting and does it cover burning the material or fumes? What happens if you laser cut kevlar or styrene? (That’s your cue to go find the MSDS documents for these materials.) Depending on where the laser cutter is installed, there might be requirements from the FDA, EPA, OSHA, local business codes, labor codes, safety codes, etc. (Reminder: I’m in the US and not a lawyer, so I’m mostly going to make vague references to US legal systems and ignore the rest of the world.)

How bad are the fumes, really?

I took apart a laser cutter for parts and took photos of the wear and tear caused by fumes. It was used in a machine shop with good fume extraction and there was still a fair amount of damage to the internal parts. I don’t know what they cut but the amount of rust and corrosion suggests that it was releasing fumes you shouldn’t breathe.

What do you do with these fumes?

So you’re pulling the fumes out of your laser cutter, what do you do with them other than just vent them out a nearby window?

It still depends on the answer to: “What are you cutting?” Did you read the MSDS? Does it even have a MSDS? Note that a MSDS isn’t going to list “cutting by laser” it’s going to use more generic terms like “burning,” “melting,” “smoke,” or “vapors”.

If you’re only cutting something relatively safe, say paper or balsa, you’re creating “wood smoke” which is an easy problem to solve.

Do you know what the media you’re cutting is made of so you can find the MSDS? Before you etch a stack of Moleskin brand sketchbooks, do you know what they’re made of? PVC. Ok, so what happens when you etch and cut PVC? It releases hot chlorine gas that quickly converts to hot hydrochloric acid, and that acid is not good for a laser cutter’s internal parts or the people running the machine.

What if there’s no MSDS? This is where you get to do some science so you can figure out what fumes you’re generating. Cutting thin plywood generates mostly wood smoke, cutting MDF or hardboard means you’re also cutting a lot of glues or maybe paint. If you’re laser etching old paint, is there lead in that paint and the fumes that comes off the etch?

Plan on filtering your fumes

For recreational or hobby use it’s pretty easy to filter fumes and the cost is relatively low to that of a laser cutter. There are a variety of plans online and you can find one that fits your needs I suspect that using a laser cutter a few hours a week generates less air pollution than a gas lawnmower, but neighbors won’t complain about lawn mowers the way they will about the smell of burning plastic.

If you’re working in a manufacturing or art space, filtration could be cheap or free. If there’s already extraction for welding fumes or metalworking machines, you might be
able to use theirs depending on the fumes you generate.

If I were running a professional job shop or a hacker space a commercial filtration system that could handle the nasty fumes from some plastics and resins would be worth the investment. This also goes back to the issue of local regulations, you might have to have some sort of professional certificate or verification that your filtering system works.

Legal restrictions

If you’re renting or don’t legally own and control your space, you’re going to have to go by the owner’s rules. If you’re at a university you’ll probably need to talk to facilities, if you’re in an apartment complex that’s the landlord, or “ask your parents”.

In the US we have federal, state, county, city, local zoning, and various safety restrictions related to wildlife and waste discharge. It could be as simple as “filter your fumes and don’t annoy the neighbors” — I know a few people who have run laser cutters in their garage and never gotten a complaint.

If it’s a hacker space or business getting a laser cuttere there are additional regs to follow. There might be fire code regulations, safety requirements, or additional rules to comply with along with ventilation rules. I’ve seen local regulations where a permit (which costs money) and inspection (more money) are required for an exhaust vent larger than 4 inches in diameter. The regs can be as simple as “exhaust vent” or as specific as “industrial exhaust vent for fabrication equipment”. When I was looking to rent studio
space within Pittsburgh city limits, if I asked about “exhaust ventilation” the landlord just said “no”. No question of what I wanted to vent, they simply didn’t want to deal with exhaust issues.

Question time!

Please leave questions (and answers) in the comments, if there’s enough interest we can turn this in to a FAQ or wiki.

2015/09/07

Upgrading HP DAT72 drivers on OS X with hp_ltt

Filed under: OS X and Linux — jet @ 11:01

Under OS X 10.9 I was unable to get hp_ltt to find the newest firmware for my tape drive in interactive mode. For some reason it couldn’t verify the signature on the file or map it to the installed drive.

Here’s my workaround using the CLI version of hp_ltt:

First, run:
./hp_ltt -f scan

This will create the file ~/Library/Application Support/Hewlett-Packard/LTT/saved_scan.txt

This file contains two lines, the second has the device path at the start and the current driver version at the end

HBA_5383_65524:HP:DAT72X6:B312
path HBA_5383_65524
version B312

Then force a firmware load:

./hp_ltt -f firmware -p=HBA_5383_65524 file=/path/to/your/firmware/LTT_HP_DAT72X6_B604.frm

This has no feedback, all it does is blank the screen until the process finishes and the drive is rebooted for self testing.

Using scan again we can see that the driver was updated to B604:

HBA_5383_65524:HP:DAT72X6:B604

2015/06/27

100 years ago today

Filed under: Random and Pleasing — jet @ 10:14

I’ve been reading history trying to find more on a composer (Joseph Joachim) and got distracted by what was happening 100 years ago.

By the end of June, 1915, the Germans had started using chemical weapons (chlorine gas) in WWI trench warfare and the Turks had started what became the genocide of more than a million Armenians. By the end of the year, Cornell professor Muenter set off a bomb in the Senate and shot JP Morgan, the KKK was recognized by the state of Georgia, “In Flanders Fields” was published, the British killed thousands of their own soldiers when weather blew chemical weapons back in to their own trenches, and Germany said they’ll try to stop sinking so many civilian ships with their u-boats.

My biggest problem in 2015: planning my weekend around the endless rain and thunderstorms. I need to weld for a client which means opening the windows for fresh air but I can’t do that in the rain, attend a beekeeping pest management class if it’s not cancelled due to rain, and sort out 2nd position alto scales before giving “Hebrew Melody” another try.

No chemical weapons, no endless trench warfare, no genocides, no countries attacking mass transit systems interfering with my life.

2015/06/13

Busy as a, well, bee

Filed under: Beekeeping — jet @ 21:08

Good contract gig, finally finishing my latest lasersaur, and because I have so much free time…. BEES!

Photos for now, but words and updates of my hive tracking spreadsheet coming soon.

photos are on Flickr

and videos on vimeo.

Testing a link to Repasky’s book on swarming.

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